Picture Exchange Communication System® (PECS®)

  I’m sure many of you might be thinking what exactly is PECS? PECS is a form of augmentative and alternation communication that is used to help individuals, who have limited or no functional communication skills, to learn in a systematic and evidenced based manner. PECS can help with the development of speech, and most likely achieve a reduction in behavior issues. Below is a flow chart to decide if your child is a good candidate for PECS (click on the flowchart for a clearer view): Cop...
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Augmentative/Alternative Communication

For those of you who do not know, May is speech and hearing month! This is a very important topic in the world of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), as one of the core characteristics of a person with ASD is impairment with communication. This also affects another common characteristic – deficits in social interaction. Both of these characteristics are essential to improved quality of life for all human beings, including your child with ASD. According to the Simons Foundation Autism Research Ini...
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Building Auditory Processing/Listening Comprehension Skills with ABA

ABA teaches auditory processing/listening comprehension skills through a systematic approach based on the individual child.  Starting from just understanding single words, ABA teaches at the child’s pace using data-based decisions to guide the therapist where the child’s strengths and deficits are. Comprehension/listening skills training can begin with simple, one word directions, like “Sit.” instead of saying “Come, sit over here.”  Especially for a child who may not be talking yet, he m...
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Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD) and Autism

Central Auditory Processing Disorder Central Auditory Processing Disorder (CAPD) affects about 5% of children.  Central Auditory Processing Disorder means that the Auditory Processing Disorder is the “central” or primary diagnosis.  Inherent in children diagnosed with an Autism Spectrum Disorder are many “auditory processing deficits,” but one would not diagnose the child with Autism with CAPD, as Autism is the primary diagnosis.  The deficits, whether primary or secondary still remain nearly...
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PECS- Picture Exchange Communication System

PECS Picture Exchange Communication System, referred to as PECS, is a system of visuals designed and proven to teach children who cannot speak how to communicate through pictures and eventually how to vocally communicate with others.  In addition to selecting a desired picture, the child is taught to verbally say what he wants as well, as he is selecting the picture.         PHASE I Children learn to exchange just one picture to receive an item or activ...
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What Autism Looks Like

Overview The essential features of Autism are impaired development of language and social skills. A severe insistence on sameness and routine is another classic marker. Sensory processing deficits, including self-stimulatory behavior, are also inherent in Autism Spectrum Disorders. These can vary greatly from child to child, that is why Autism is a spectrum disorder. Socially Social aspects of Autism include lack of eye contact, facial expressions, theory of mind/perspective taking, and...
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Increasing Language, Ages 19-24 months

19-24months
Here is the next installment in a series focusing on language development in children ages 6 months to 3 years of age. In this third segment in the series, babies ages 19 to 24 months are addressed. Between the ages of 19 and 24 months, children, on average, are able to say fewer than 50 words. Their receptive language is better then expressive, and they may be able to string two words together.  Receptive language refers to pointing or touching objects when another person says, “Where is the...
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Increasing Language in An Older Baby

Here is the next installment in a series focusing on language delays in children ages 6 months to 3 years of age. In this second segment in the series, babies ages 13-18 months are addressed. Increasing Language in An Older Baby —From ages 13-18 months of age, children, on average, are able to: Use one or more words “Know what they mean” Demonstrates receptive identification Practice inflection for questions At this age, signs of delay to look for would be: —Doesn’t point ...
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Increasing Language in a Young Baby

The next few articles will be focusing on language delays in children from ages 6 months to 3 years of age. In this first segment in the series, the young baby ages 6-12 months is addressed. Increasing Language in a Young Baby Before delving into figuring out how to help a young baby with a language delay, its first necessary to understand how language develops in a baby. Babies learn language incidentally through imitation and positive reinforcement: Imitation: Babies vocally im...
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